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Category Archives: spring

Crocus Pocus

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Spring has an undeniable magic: a warm breath of wind on what should be a chilly morning; a thread of scent, spicy and sweet–winter honeysuckle, perhaps–that’s gone before you’re sure it was there; buds that swell into being seemingly overnight.

Spring, much like hope, springs eternal

All this magical blooming and bursting and bubbling up of new life has side effects, of course: every swathe of green grass (more violently green in those patches that the dog favored last fall) sprouts a bumper crop of bodies–singles, couples, families–intent on exposing winter-white and waxen limbs to the rays of the young sun while lolling on bright quilts and tartan throws (that icon of spontaneous picnickery plucked from the trunk of the family truckster). These ground covers are regarded as talismans imbued with miraculous powers to protect the lollers from the simultaneous dangers of rampant sunburn, grass allergies, and rising damp that precedes a a sore throat and sniffles by about 24 hours after having engaged in the perilous practice of casting off clothing (a.k.a. “spring-fling”) too early in the season.

(With apologies to poet William Stevenson, “Back and side go bare, go bare, both foot and hand go cold…”)

In a nutshell? Enjoy the magic of spring from the safety of your socks, shoes, and sweaters–at least until the frost melts and the oak leaves are as big as squirrels’ ears, phenologically speaking. Or, in post-modern terms, plant your non-genetically modified heirloom ‘taters when the girls at the schoolbus stop shed their Uggs for flip-flops…

Madness in March

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It is madness in March*–especially in the mountains of Western North Carolina–to dream that a couple of warm days mean spring is nearly here. A couple of warm days is just that: a couple of warm days. We’ve had them this week–beautiful, blue-sky days with temperatures in the 70’s…but you just can’t trust ’em. The Bradford pear trees up and down Biltmore Avenue might have been fooled into blooming, but those trees are always foolish like that.

February 2009 was mostly gray and cold and miserable, and if there is global warming, WNC hasn’t gotten the message yet. As the old-timers say, “I grew up so far back in a hollow that we had to pipe in sunshine–and we only got it about three hours a day!”

Speaking of old-timers, here’s a legend for you: the Bride & Groom of Pisgah. (That’s Mt. Pisgah**, if you’re not from around here, but mostly it’s just Pisgah.)

Anyway, legend has it that a young couple fell in love, but their parents (or maybe just the girl’s father) didn’t want them to marry. They were so much in love, however, that they decided to run away and get married, even without parental blessings. The couple planned everything in secret, and one cold, snowy night, the young man came to the girl’s house and they stole away under cover of darkness. Her father found out and chased after them. The couple ran up on Pisgah to get away from him, but the father was close behind, threatening to kill the young man. Unfortunately, it was so cold and dark and icy that the young couple missed the path and fell off the mountain (or maybe they froze to death; depends on who’s telling the story). The girl’s father found them, and knew he’d caused the tragedy. Forever after, so the legend goes, whenever it’s cold and snowy, you can see the “bride and groom” in their wedding finery on the side of Pisgah.

"Bride & Groom" on Mt. Pisgah

"Bride & Groom" of Mt. Pisgah

From a distance, it really does look like a man (left) standing beside a woman (right) in a veil and a long dress. Yes, it’s obviously a rock formation that ices over and stands out white in the winter…but isn’t the legend of the “Bride & Groom of Pisgah” a much nicer way of describing it?

(I’m actually guilty of thinking the formation looks a little bit like a matador waving his cape [the groom’s head could be that odd little hat-thing bullfighters wear, and the bride could be the cape], but I prefer the original. It’s not my story, exactly, but I’m sticking to it!)

*If you stumbled across this post looking for “March Madness,” you’re barking up the wrong blog!

**The original Mt. Pisgah is in the present-day country of Jordan. In the Old Testament, God spoke to Moses and said, “Get thee up into the top of Pisgah, and lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward, and behold [it] with thine eyes: for thou shalt not go over this Jordan.” (Deuteronomy 3:27).

A “Fur” Piece

I can always tell which season it is by petting my dog Penny, a shepherd-chow mix. Her coat is a sort of seasonal barometer, if you will, of what’s happening in the natural world. Here are the basics:

Winter: It doesn’t even get that cold here, but Penny’s fur thickens as if she were destined to spend cold, lonely nights on the tundra, far from any sort of shelter. Winter always finds a few leaves determined to initiate dreadlocks in her fluffy “pajamas”–the long hair on the back of her hind legs. Her heels are always damp in winter, too, and she seeks out piles of frosty leaves (or snow) for napping.

Spring: For some reason, Penny finds what appear to be praying mantis hatchlings–tiny, perfectly formed, and just the color of new grass. She’ll have any number of them caught in her tufty spring coat and I have to very gently remove them and put ’em back outside. A little later in the season, she’ll return from a walk in the woods covered in what is known as “beggar lice.” These small seed-pod type plants* are as verdantly green as the praying mantis hatchlings and shaped like a triangle with rounded edges. The outer husk is sort of sticky, like Velcro, and will firmly attach itself to pants and shoelaces and socks and dog fur. Inside, there’s a single green seed (pit? drupe?) that I suppose wants to set up shop in new places, and that’s why it hitches a ride on whatever passes by. Penny loves the taste of these things, and will snap up every one I pull out of her fur.   

Summer: The season of grass clippings, green field burs, and even the occasional swatch of blackberry briars snagged in the long hair of her tail. I find the occasional tick, as well, wandering around in her dense and impenetrable double-coat like a dazed Legionnaire stumbling through the desert in search of water.

Fall: Fur was made for fall! It traps the scent of burning leaves, elevating the standard “eau de dog” to something that could be bottled and sold as cheveux du chien fumeux pour homme. Delicious! In addition to her smoking habits, Penny has a knack for locating spiny, urchin-sized burrs and allowing them to set up housekeeping in her ruff and haunches. It takes quite a while to work them loose, and one false move can cause the brittle burrs to shatter, sending each separate little barb deeper into the forest of fur. While performing this much-needed groomage, I tell Penny she has “burrs upon hers” in honor of Dr. Seuss’ star-bellied Sneetches who had “star upon thars.” She’s never really thanked me, but it’s got to feel better to lay down when there isn’t a needle-pointed burr digging into your hip.

Occasionally I wonder what it would be like to live with a house-bound hound whose fur remains sleek and unsullied between baths. No seasonal flora and fauna to contend with, no particular smells other than Chinese take-out or scented candles. Oh, well…

*If you want more info, this site offered a very nice description and photos of beggar lice: http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek040908.html

A "Fur" Piece

I can always tell which season it is by petting my dog Penny, a shepherd-chow mix. Her coat is a sort of seasonal barometer, if you will, of what’s happening in the natural world. Here are the basics:

Winter: It doesn’t even get that cold here, but Penny’s fur thickens as if she were destined to spend cold, lonely nights on the tundra, far from any sort of shelter. Winter always finds a few leaves determined to initiate dreadlocks in her fluffy “pajamas”–the long hair on the back of her hind legs. Her heels are always damp in winter, too, and she seeks out piles of frosty leaves (or snow) for napping.

Spring: For some reason, Penny finds what appear to be praying mantis hatchlings–tiny, perfectly formed, and just the color of new grass. She’ll have any number of them caught in her tufty spring coat and I have to very gently remove them and put ’em back outside. A little later in the season, she’ll return from a walk in the woods covered in what is known as “beggar lice.” These small seed-pod type plants* are as verdantly green as the praying mantis hatchlings and shaped like a triangle with rounded edges. The outer husk is sort of sticky, like Velcro, and will firmly attach itself to pants and shoelaces and socks and dog fur. Inside, there’s a single green seed (pit? drupe?) that I suppose wants to set up shop in new places, and that’s why it hitches a ride on whatever passes by. Penny loves the taste of these things, and will snap up every one I pull out of her fur.   

Summer: The season of grass clippings, green field burs, and even the occasional swatch of blackberry briars snagged in the long hair of her tail. I find the occasional tick, as well, wandering around in her dense and impenetrable double-coat like a dazed Legionnaire stumbling through the desert in search of water.

Fall: Fur was made for fall! It traps the scent of burning leaves, elevating the standard “eau de dog” to something that could be bottled and sold as cheveux du chien fumeux pour homme. Delicious! In addition to her smoking habits, Penny has a knack for locating spiny, urchin-sized burrs and allowing them to set up housekeeping in her ruff and haunches. It takes quite a while to work them loose, and one false move can cause the brittle burrs to shatter, sending each separate little barb deeper into the forest of fur. While performing this much-needed groomage, I tell Penny she has “burrs upon hers” in honor of Dr. Seuss’ star-bellied Sneetches who had “star upon thars.” She’s never really thanked me, but it’s got to feel better to lay down when there isn’t a needle-pointed burr digging into your hip.

Occasionally I wonder what it would be like to live with a house-bound hound whose fur remains sleek and unsullied between baths. No seasonal flora and fauna to contend with, no particular smells other than Chinese take-out or scented candles. Oh, well…

*If you want more info, this site offered a very nice description and photos of beggar lice: http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek040908.html